Not a normal Friday in Libya


I'm starting to feel totally out of synch. The days are starting to run into one another and all feel the same. Today was Friday, and I tried to keep it like any other normal Friday. I got up and started in on the laundry, scrubbed my bathroom and started lunch. When it came time for Friday prayers I went outside and worked a bit in the garden - pulling weeds. And of course listening to the sounds in the distance. I wanted it to be like a normal Friday, but of course it wasn't. 

Not long after Friday prayers ended I could hear helicopters in the distance. I kept pulling weeds, straining my ears to hear the sounds in the distance, but it was windy and I couldn't tell which direction the sounds were coming from. I gave up and came inside. After lunch I checked to see what was happening on the internet, but there was no connection. I watched TV for a bit with the kids, but it was depressing and stressful. 

I needed to lose myself - to find something that would absorb my attention - take me someplace else in my imagination. I curled up under a blanket and watched the film 'The King's Speech'. It's a film about King George the 5th and how he overcame his speech impediment. Of course his speeches were all written for him by a professional writer - he just had to say them. Quite the oposite here in Libya! Bla, bla, bla. Shibber, shibber! Zinga, Zinga! Dar, dar!... Makes you want to laugh but then you stop yourself when you realise how sad it all is. 


The telephones were on today. I got a call from one of my students who gave me the message that the brother-in-law of one of my other students had died of bullet wounds. There is no way for me to go to the funeral (I might suffer the same fate on the way) so I'll have to call her to offer my condolances.... that is when I can manage to get a line through. 



Comments

  1. Thoughts and prayers continue to go out to you, your family and Libya.

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  2. I dont now much about Libya.Is it so bad that people resorting to desperate measures to risk their lives to overthrow the governament?
    What does the people of Libya want?Its not clear at all at this point.

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  3. I came upon your blog while trying to find meaning of shibber, shibber, dar, dar, zenga, zenga, fred, fred. These quotes I came across on Conan O'brien's late show.

    I want to be honest with you. Without having met a single Libyan in my life, I come view Libya poorly. Partly, it is the hollywood movies, press reports but mostly, it is because I cannot understand how Libyans could allow themselves to be overrun for 40 years. All normal development of individuals and institutions have stagnated. This is the reason most foriegn countries are clueless about what to do. There is no individual, group or institution that will be able fill in the gap.

    Having said that and reading thoughts of atleast one Libyan, I feel I should appologise. As an outsider, I am totally disconnected from the events in Libya. Coming from country which is free to choose its leaders and where we freely and fairly chose some of the best crooks and gangsters, I cannot judge Libya.

    I would pray that you, your family, friends and country are able to come of this period safer and stronger.

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  4. Marvin.... Shiber, shibber refers to a unit of measurement equaling the length of your hand, Zinga is a street, bait is a house and dar is a room, etc. Essentially what he is doing is threatening genocide. Inch by inch, street by street, house by house, room by room he will get rid of all those who are against him.


    Libyans have tolerated this for so long because they have lived in fear and intimidation.And they hope and dream for a better life and a better Libya. By the way, I am not Libyan. I am American. For the past 21 years Libya has been my home for me, my Libyan husband and our six children.

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  5. Six children! Wow. Still thinking about you and praying for you. Benghazi is free, you will be soon. Richard Engel of NBC asked a Libyan protester how much longer it would take to overthrow Gadeffi. The protester said, "we want to beat Egypt." Stay safe! Stay in. Do you have some great books on your Kindle?

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  6. Karen.. I pray this ends soon. I've got a Sony reader and even better a Galaxy Tab. Over a 1,000 books on there. I am soooo happy that I got the Tab. It's much faster for the internet than my PC or laptop and with the apps I can still see Facebook when they block it here. ;)

    Keep us in your prayers.

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  7. Again take care, be careful, hold on. Thinking of you and all other Libyans.

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  8. You, your family and country are in my prayers.

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  9. I wake up every day thinking about you and your family. When I come here and see you are all still safe, it's such a relief. This morning it hit me what this time must be like for your mom (and the rest of your stateside family) - they must be sick with worry. Please be careful. I will continue to pray for you and all the brave Libyans. - SuziJane (this won't accept my Google ID for some reason)

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  10. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1b9yHyrlUMI

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  11. Khadija I've been following your blog for a little over a year now but have never made a comment cuz my computer skills suck but I really cant let this critical time pass without letting you know how much I love your blog because so much of it could have been written by me.I'm an American living in Benghazi with my Libyan husband and our 5 kids but I've been here for 33 years compared to your 21 which gives me seniority in the eccentric[crazy?]American married to a Libyan category!I also teach English in a mahad and a private school.My eldest daughter's name is Nora and I'm pretty sure my hubby is less of a handy man than yours cause he hasn't managed to build a house to paint!Anyway keep up the blog and keep up your spirits..Benghazi is free[at least for now ] and soon you will be too inshaallah.

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  12. May God keep you and your family safe, take care.

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