All is not quiet in the country


Just when I thought I'd have a quiet evening at home...... Sara had pizzas in the oven, Ibrahim was playing with his rabbit, the rest of the kids were watching TV, and I was chatting online with my mom.

All of a sudden, the dogs started barking like crazy, and then I heard a car... beep! beep! Not one car... two! Out piled a crowd of in-laws... big, small, old, young - all chattering at once. 

The ladies were ushered into one room the men in another, the children running back and forth. Ibrahim's poor rabbit was put hastily back in his cage where it would be reasonably safe from half a dozen small children. Out came the chocolates that had been hidden in Nora's closet (for surprise guests), tea and fresh hot pizza. The TV was blasting in the background. Everyone seemed to all talk at once, a party atmosphere prevailed. 

None of my sister-in-laws are going to visit anyone that lives in the city now. I guess until things return to normal I should expect visitors to drop in. On the list for tomorrow: Bake a cake, for just in case. 

Comments

  1. According to Italian papers something happened in Beida for sure.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi im an english girl, my boyfriend is currently in Benghazi. Is it safe to visit?

    ReplyDelete
  3. This letter is in response to the articles covering the civil unrest
    occurring in Libya.

    As a citizen of and believer in democracy, I applaud the efforts of the Libyan people. Their efforts are similar to what is happening in Yemen, Algeria and Bahrain as well as the most recent revolutions in Egypt and Tunisia.

    Believe it or not, one thing that trumps capitalism and political
    correctness in the United States is the right to have one's voice heard. This is the foundation of which our democracy is built on. The Libyan people should continue to defy Moammar Gadhafi's powerful
    security forces so that Libyan democracy can begin to thrive. It is unfortunate that the United States compromised on one of its most fundamental values in order to protect its economic interests in the Middle East; something that happens all too often domestically as well. It is not the Libyan people that are attempting to seize power but rather it is those currently in power who have engaged in intimidation to prevent the will of the people from being heard. Why else would they stoop to such
    underhanded tactics to block various means of communication among the citizens of Libya? Why is the government in power utilizing such political strong-arm tactics as the use of violence?

    Moammar Gadhafi, you have had forty-two years to lead Libya and have failed them by your own choosing. The days of the despotic regime are finally coming to an end as it appears the desire for freedom will continue to sweep among the Arab nations. Accordingly, let the call go forth among all citizens of Libya that your brothers and sisters of democracy from all over the world are with you during every trial and tribulation you may
    encounter during this crisis. To the people of Libya, the trumpet of
    freedom beckons you to rise in protest and ensure your voice to preserve your sacred heritage, promote your children's future and obtain the blessings of liberty we all cherish. Moammar Gadhafi, let the people go!

    JOE BIALEK
    Cleveland, OH USA

    ReplyDelete
  4. My family is thinking of all our countrymen and women. Our families and friends who are amid this time of uncertantity. May Allah protect the People of Libya and may Allah accept the Mrtyrs. Say hello to all the sisters there. I am hoping to visit again soon.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Dear Joe: While your intentions probably mean well, you must understand that posting these types of things on this person's web blog without her ability to monitor or delete may cause her problems.

    ReplyDelete

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