Saturday, May 18, 2013

Ideas anyone?

What would YOU like me to write about?

Let me know by telling me in a comment.


14 comments:

  1. Something happy, something positive and present you. Cheers from a fan http://hind-toufga.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  2. Khadija, how about writing about what you especially enjoy about life in Libya and what keeps you going through the tough times. I shall be moving over soon with my family so I would love to hear about your positive experiences.

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  3. Lessons you've learned as an EFL teacher from my own experience, the greatest lessons you learn are sometimes learned when you are yourself teaching. I am curious to know if you've got any such experiences here in Libya...

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  4. Hi, Teri. Loved seeing your beautiful garden. The plants look familiar and you've given me a couple ideas. You ask about suggestions for posts (although your blog is interesting as it is): I find your daily life linked to the political life in Libya to be interesting. I'd like to read some of your thoughts on the situation in Libya and how this affects your life and maybe how the educational situation is going. Maybe some Roman ruins thrown in?!?
    If you should be in the Tunis area in the near future, let me know and I'll take you to Uthina.
    best, nadia
    PS I may be teaching ESL next fall.......

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    Replies
    1. Changes you've noticed in ordinary/everyday life post-revolution, education system (differences between public and private), what your students are like, what it is like to raise girls in Libya compared to your own childhood, archeology/history of Tripoli and any interesting/unusual places around Tripoli that are worth visiting, if you think it is appropriate/safe, what you think about current political environment because it is changing so much, Libyan weddings and how to behave at them when you're not Libyan, matchmaking, your farm, things your kids say and do, the seasons in Libya, and most of all stories like the one about your mother-in-law's broken/not broken toe!

      Separately can I ask what Kalam frukh means in English? Maybe a blog on useful expressions like this or Libyan slang too?

      Thanks,

      Delete
    2. Changes you've noticed in ordinary/everyday life post-revolution, education system (differences between public and private), what your students are like, what it is like to raise girls in Libya compared to your own childhood, archeology/history of Tripoli and any interesting/unusual places around Tripoli that are worth visiting, if you think it is appropriate/safe, what you think about current political environment because it is changing so much, Libyan weddings and how to behave at them when you're not Libyan, matchmaking, your farm, things your kids say and do, the seasons in Libya, and most of all stories like the one about your mother-in-law's broken/not broken toe!

      Separately can I ask what Kalam frukh means in English? Maybe a blog on useful expressions like this or Libyan slang too?

      Thanks,

      Delete
  5. Your daily life, what you have for breakfast, what you see in the street, the insects you find and the flowers you see, the stuff in the shops (or not)
    Great blog, I really enjoy it even though I don't know you!
    Wembley

    ReplyDelete
  6. -Raising kids in a dual culture marriage
    -engagements
    -treatment of women/ foreign women married to Libyans
    -job prospects for women/foreign women
    - photos of different areas/unique houses
    -cost of living
    -your own frustrations

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  7. -Raising kids in a dual culture marriage
    -Your daily life, what you have for breakfast
    -recipes - Libyan food !
    -old pics

    ReplyDelete
  8. -Raising kids in a dual culture marriage
    -old pics
    -recipes, Libyan food , how u learned to cook,

    ReplyDelete
  9. How a foreign woman can survive in her Libyan family!
    regards.

    ReplyDelete
  10. How a foreign woman can survive in her Libyan family.

    Regards

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi, I don't know if you still remember me, I used to read your blog a lot and commented on some of your posts. Anyway, my husband and I were posted in Libya for about two years and was there when the Arab spring started, I was sent home but my husband stayed during the whole thing and was transferred a few months later. I still think about Libya most times and remember my stay and would like to read about how things are there.
    I also enjoy reading about places there, like the one you wrote on its history and holding a quiz to see who knows what it is. Thanks and look forward to your posts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, still remember you and still following your blog and travels. :)

      Delete

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