I miss ... I don't miss

It's been nearly a month since I've been anywhere in the vicinity of an open can of tuna. I haven't eaten anything even remotely resembling Libyan food. And guess what?

I don't miss it one bit! There are a lot of things that I love about Libya and I miss when I am away... but I don't think I could ever miss Libyan food!

There are lot's of Libyans that live abroad... What do you miss most?


Comments

  1. My family and friends
    The streets I walked when I was young
    The places I have my sweet memories attached to when I was a teenager
    My mom’s and sisters home cooking
    The Mediterranean sea & the beautiful shores of Janzour

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  2. i miss the fact that i missed out on years of 'getting to know' the extended family :)

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  3. I miss my family and my college’s friends.

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  4. When I'm in Libya, I love tuna - especially with harisa for breakfast. When I go back to the UK, I can't look at it for several months... Longer; I got back from my last trip nearly a year ago, and I've just started eating it again recently.

    I expect to be going back to Libya this autumn, so I'll soon start a tuna fast, build up my appetite for it.

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  5. I miss family, a dip in the sea, the blue clear sky, the sun, the old city, and all Libyan food, as I always cook it over here especially: Bazen, Fatat, Basesa, Rishta, Osban, roasted lamb head and of course Tuna, but of course, I don't miss it a lot as I nearly eat it everyday here, I even buy a can of tuna and devour it plainly without anything with it.

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  6. To be honest, I miss everything back home: the atmospher, the people,the cusine....etc.
    Actually ,there is no place like home..Never Ever^_^

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  7. Khadijateri for you and others to read:
    FROM A FATHER TO A DOCTOR

    After spending the late morning with Father Pawlowski, I stumbled
    across Dr Shakshuka, on the fringes of the flea market, in Jaffa.

    I ordered the cheap, but laughably misnamed "business lunch".

    Within moments of my choice, the waiter descended on my table with eight dishes.

    There were four types of meat, the sort that appears to have been
    cooked for a day at a low, slow heat, then given a massage, then sent
    on holiday, and only when it has become at one with its surrounding
    ingredients and is so relaxed that it falls off the bone at the mere
    approach of your fork, is it then ready to be served.

    All the dishes (bar the bed of couscous) went some way to explain why
    fat is such a good convection agent for flavour.

    The good doctor's real name is Bino Gabso. His place has been serving
    shakshuka (a breakfast dish of eggs poached in a spicy tomato sauce)
    and utterly un-businesslike lunches for 17 years. Before him, his
    father also had an eatery in Jaffa. The family came to Israel in 1949,
    from Libya.

    I was barely able to talk after lunch, even after a large, strong
    Arabic coffee, but I managed to croak the tired journalist's question:
    "Is there a secret?"

    "No," Bino replied with fetching directness. "It is Libyan food. There
    is no secret. In Tripoli, people only have food. They have nothing
    else in their lives. They don't have music, anything. When they're at
    work, all they think about is food, and how they're going to make it
    when they finish work."

    Many may take issue with Bino's reduction of Libyan life culture to a
    mess of lamb and beans. But one thing is certain. If you have business
    to conclude, do it before you order Dr Shakshuka's business lunch, not
    after.
    PS: I don't know the exact source of the text as it was forwarded to me by my husband, anyway it gives us something to think about regarding Libyan food. Regards
    Hala

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  8. Hala.... what an interesting story! I still don"t wanna eat Libyan food..blechhh!

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  9. Garry.... I knew you'd end up back here sometime.. lolol.. Tuna awaits you!

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  10. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/8032339.stm
    this is the source of the text.
    regards

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  11. KhadijaTeri,
    I think we need to meet one day.
    I understand that we need a change from a monotonous diet/cuisine. variety and creativity are required in the kitchen and for the sake of our palates and taste buds.
    I think you need to rediscover the Libyan or tripolitanian cuisine from a true Tripolitanian and I'm one. Some people are cooking an ersatz of Tripolitanian cuisine.
    regards Hala

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  12. Hala... I know all about Libyan food. My husband is from Tripoli and we've been married almost 30 years and 20 years have been spent in Libya. I've learned how to cook from more than just Tripolitanians too. Yefren, Misrata, Sebha, Benghazi... even Libyan Jewish food. Still, I find the cuisine boring and monotonous.

    The only person that likes Libyan food in my house is my husband - the kids are just not interested. So if I cook it what doesn't get eaten goes in the trash or to the dogs and that to me is just wasteful.

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  13. semi anonymous said ...
    i-miss-i-dont-miss.
    i miss u
    idont miss your cooking.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I miss :

    The voice of Athan 5 times a day which is not coming from my laptop.

    My parents.

    My niece.

    Our green garden, and the aroma of the Jasmine bushes, it is in this time of the year when it start to bloom.

    And finally Zometta, the rest of the Libyan food I manged to get it.

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  15. I sure miss Libyan food, sorry!
    I miss the hot weather.
    I miss the desert wind.
    I miss the call to prayer, especially the morning call.

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  16. semi-anonymous... you just wait till I get home. I will cook you a meal you won't forget. And if I hear even one little complaint you will find yourself eating at your mother's house! LOL!

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  17. I love Libyan food! Some more than others, but any type of food becomes monotonous when repeated too often.However I think we have no famous 'traditional' Desserts to speak of, so would you bring me some delicious apple-pie? It makes me drool just to think of it!
    Umm Salwan

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  18. i think any one who travel without causes other country is big lier to say miss .miss .miss ,,, if you miss your mom as some one say. you can visit her at least one of the year.pleas do not looking for excuses

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  19. I think there is no one who missed his or her country . you can return back or visit your family one of the year. be enough. the moms whose missing you but you have stone heart.. shame to say i miss without causes .. you country waiting you.

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  20. The Sea and spotless beaches.

    Al-Fatah University, and all the cute babes who apparantly live there.

    The smell of sewers (rotten egg smell)in and around the side-streets of 1st Sept Rd.

    The face of our ,ever-lasting, courageous, perfect, all-knowing leader of the revolution, and king of kings, Col. Gaddafi plastered all over the streets.

    Thats all.

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  21. I long for my mother's bread

    My mother's coffee

    Her touch

    Childhood memories grow up in me

    Day after day

    I must be worth my life

    At the hour of my death

    Worth the tears of my mother

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  22. Dear Khadija,
    I have been in USA for one year, I lived in Philadelphia, PA ,and now I am in new Jersey. I went to Miami, Orlando, New york, Boston. Until now I can not eat American food, really I can not tolerate it, I miss my food, family, friends, unlabeled streets, I am not criticizing your country, but if I get my degree,I will not sleep one more night in USA.
    Some people used to accommodate the place that they moving to, but I couldn't.

    ReplyDelete

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