at long last . . .

Finally my ADSL problems seem to have been taken care of. Now my major worry is whether the electric company will not mess up whatever work it is that they are doing in front of my house and leave me without electricity.

The streets in my area are all dug up. There are trenches dug everywhere along the streets and roads. It's a mess and it's also very noisy. While digging they broke the water pipes that supply water to my neighbour and they have been without water for the last couple of days. But so far our house has been OK. I am expecting that they will turn off the electricity at some point. I just have to remember to save my work as often as possible in case it happens.

Around the corner from my house is a street that's a bit wider than the others and the workers have been storing all their vehicles and equipment there. It looks like they will be staying there for a while. What a mess they are making. They did this a few years back and it took them forever - now it seems they are doing it all over again. Oh well, I guess it's making sure someone has a job.

Technology! You can't live without it. In the last week the both the vacuum cleaner and the microwave oven have called it quits. So we are doing old fashioned stuff in my house now. Having to heat up food the conventional way - on the stove. And we've gone back to using a broom. It is amazing how these two items change your life. You don't notice it until they aren't there. Have to either get them repaired or replaced because I don't like doing things the old fashioned way anymore. Not enough luxuries here to begin with so every little bit counts!

Comments

  1. http://news.independent.co.uk/world/africa/article348183.ece


    Rape victims in Libya 'detained'
    By Anne Penketh, Diplomatic editor
    Published: 28 February 2006

    Libyan women and girls including rape victims are being placed in "social rehabilitation" centres which are being used as an ideological brainwashing tool by the authorities, Human Rights Watch claims.

    A team from the human rights organisation was granted access to two of the centres, and releases its report today. Officially portrayed as protective homes for women and girls "vulnerable to engaging in moral misconduct", Human Rights Watch says the facilities house rape victims who have been ostracised for "staining their families' honour".

    Women and girls who have no male guardian have also been placed in the centres. They say they are treated like criminals.

    Farida Deif, the researcher who visited the centres, said that "these facilities are far more punitive than protective". She said she was told that the Libyan authorities "don't just want to change the women's behaviour, but their personalities".

    There is no time limit for the arbitrary detentions. The total number of centres in Libya is not known.

    Responding to the charges in the report, the Libyan government said that Human Rights Watch was ignoring the Islamic values governing Libyan society, particularly the protection of women who might face "honour" killings.

    Libyan women and girls including rape victims are being placed in "social rehabilitation" centres which are being used as an ideological brainwashing tool by the authorities, Human Rights Watch claims.

    A team from the human rights organisation was granted access to two of the centres, and releases its report today. Officially portrayed as protective homes for women and girls "vulnerable to engaging in moral misconduct", Human Rights Watch says the facilities house rape victims who have been ostracised for "staining their families' honour".

    Women and girls who have no male guardian have also been placed in the centres. They say they are treated like criminals.
    Farida Deif, the researcher who visited the centres, said that "these facilities are far more punitive than protective". She said she was told that the Libyan authorities "don't just want to change the women's behaviour, but their personalities".

    There is no time limit for the arbitrary detentions. The total number of centres in Libya is not known.

    Responding to the charges in the report, the Libyan government said that Human Rights Watch was ignoring the Islamic values governing Libyan society, particularly the protection of women who might face "honour" killings.


    http://www.guardian.co.uk/elsewhere/journalist/story/0,,1720032,00.html

    Disgrace in the desert

    Libyan rape victims face arranged marriages or staying locked up in 'rehabilitation' centres, writes Brian Whitaker

    Tuesday February 28, 2006


    For 37 years since The Leader came to power, Libyans have been exposed to a daily torrent of revolutionary ideas from Colonel Muammar Gadafy. Aside from his more crazily radical adventures, though, he has also tried to enhance women's rights and has caused a good deal of mirth on his travels - as well as making a serious point - by relying on the protection of all-female bodyguards.
    Whether the colonel's ideas have made much impact on the average Libyan citizen, however, is questionable. Despite some opening-up recently, the realities of daily life inside the Great Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriyya are still very much a mystery.


    What is all this about !?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Khadijateri , if i did not know better I'd say you live in my street LOL. Enjoy ADSL.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I live in your street too lol...

    ReplyDelete
  4. Khadija ,félicitation, you are always on connection. since Adsl became available in sep 2005 I switched from my old slow dial-up to Adsl the first thing, Security, you know in libya telephone line are easy to tap, in your street there might be telephone boxes, inside these boxes you can have the access to all of the telepone line in the area,"ILLEGAL" today repairmen have to wear diffrent cloths so you can recognize who opening these boxes.
    early this week I bought the keyGhost kit http://www.keyghost.com/USB-Keylogger.htm
    for pen-testing and it works nicely, while most major vendors are convrting thier computers to use USB ports.

    ReplyDelete
  5. to anonymous: the plight of girls who find themselves in trouble is very sad. I imagine if they weren't in some kind of custody they would probably be killed by their familys. Unfortunately there isn't much help that girls in these situations can get. It isprobably worse for drug addicts and people with AIDS of HIV.

    Drug use is on the rise - my son came home from school one day to say he saw 4 men standing on the street next to ours shooting up heroin. That means they are buying nearby. (And my neighbourhood is considered a nice one - so I can only imagine what's going on in the neighbourhoods that are not so nice).

    That just means that things will probably get worse before they get better. Maybe Human Rights Watch will help by giving some suggestions on how to deal with the situation.

    ps. I hate it when people sign themselves as anonymous.

    ReplyDelete
  6. a.adam - what's the point of having keyghost? I have nothing to hide.

    ReplyDelete
  7. sorry the point of having keyghost , sometimes you don't have anything to use in, me i have some advantage like monitore some users at offices, my brother,
    I have nothing to hide
    oh don't tell me that because it's not true, you know that

    ReplyDelete
  8. Congrats on finally getting ADSL! :) welcome to the world of real surfing, I bet now you'll be literary glued to the computer for a while until you get use to it being this fast ;) I think many people now are switching actually including some of my own family.

    The funny part is how some really old Libyan folks are still cluess about this internet thing and you try to explain it, but deep down you still knwo thier way off, ZOOM.. (over there heads)

    Last thing to the person who posted about the news article, why are you even commenting on this? lool kind of strange to me..

    anyhow, salamualkum

    ReplyDelete
  9. What do you think of these web sites Khadija !?

    http://www.taslimanasrin.com/

    http://www.muslim-refusenik.com/

    Sara

    ReplyDelete
  10. Sara - haven't bothered to look - Are they relevent to the post?

    ReplyDelete
  11. Yah, relevant and not relevent to your first post. I found them interesting and could explain some of your wonders !

    Regards

    Sara

    ReplyDelete
  12. Does this mean you will have a daily post?

    ReplyDelete
  13. How HIV/AIDES people are treated here ? You just don't want to know , and neither does the WHO, the American Government with their " Help Africa " AIDES campaige which is totally non exsistant here !!! No Free meds , or any meds for that matter !The doctors , hospitals , and prison systems, and the general public attitude is let them die! But don't tell anyone . They are completely clueless in education and terrified of treating anyone with the disease . I speak from vast exsperince since my son had HIV that developed into AIDES . He was refussed treatment many times and in the end died due to complications .This is a epidemic here that is being swept under the rug blindly . Syd

    ReplyDelete

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